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@MilesOStridin

San Gabriel, CA Raving since 2021 active 2 days, 23 hours ago

About Me

  • Running club(s):
  • Rave race:
  • Race that's calling my name:

    Boston, one day!

  • I run because:

    I can! It’s good for my legs, and it’s good for my soul.

My Races

Organize, track & review your races and personal bests here.

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Half Marathon

Marathon

Ultramarathon

(Marathon or Ultra) + Half

Marathon + Ultra

Other

Future Races

Personal Bests (4)

Race Distance Location Date Result
Marathon Los Angeles, CA Nov 7, 2021 3:39:16
Half Marathon San Diego, CA Oct 24, 2021 1:39:45
10K Seal Beach, CA Nov 20, 2021 49:01
5K San Diego, CA Oct 23, 2021 24:16

Future Races (40)

Race Distance Location Date Paid
Half Marathon Huntington Beach, CA Feb 6, 2022
10K Los Angeles, CA Feb 20, 2022
Marathon Los Angeles, CA Mar 20, 2022
Marathon Big Sur, CA Apr 24, 2022
Half Marathon San Diego, CA Jun 4, 2022
Half Marathon Ashford, WA Jul 16, 2022
Half Marathon San Diego, CA Aug 21, 2022
Half Marathon Long Beach, CA Oct 8, 2022
Half Marathon Agua Dulce, CA Oct 22, 2022
Half Marathon Big Bear, CA Nov 12, 2022
Half Marathon Carnation, WA 2022
Half Marathon Banff, Canada TBD
Marathon Folsom, CA TBD
Half Marathon Falmouth, MA TBD
Marathon Chicago, IL TBD
Marathon Cincinnati, OH TBD
Half Marathon San Pedro, CA TBD
Half Marathon Kissimmee, FL TBD
Half Marathon Encinitas, CA TBD
Half Marathon Kiowa, MT TBD
Half Marathon Kiowa, MT TBD
Half Marathon Wilson, WY TBD
Marathon Two Harbors, MN TBD
Half Marathon Townsend, TN TBD
Half Marathon Koloa, HI TBD
Marathon Staten Island, NY TBD
Half Marathon Pasadena, CA TBD
Half Marathon Big Bear, CA TBD
Half Marathon Big Bear, CA TBD
Half Marathon Salt Lake City, UT TBD
Half Marathon New Orleans, LA TBD
Half Marathon San Diego, CA TBD
Marathon San Francisco, CA TBD
Marathon Seattle, WA TBD
6 hr Reedley, CA TBD
6 hr Paso Robles, CA TBD
Half Marathon Ventura, CA TBD
Dopey Challenge (48.6 Miles) Lake Buena Vista, FL TBD
Half Marathon Virgin, UT TBD
Half Marathon Virgin, UT TBD

Past Races (15)

Race Distance Location Date Result My Raves My Performance
Half Marathon Carlsbad, CA Jan 16, 2022 1:44:43
Half Marathon San Dimas, CA Dec 12, 2021 1:50:22
Half Marathon Del Mar, CA Dec 11, 2021 1:48:46
10K Seal Beach, CA Nov 20, 2021 49:01
Marathon Los Angeles, CA Nov 7, 2021 3:39:16
5K Los Angeles, CA Nov 6, 2021 25:16
Half Marathon San Diego, CA Oct 24, 2021 1:39:45
5K San Diego, CA Oct 23, 2021 24:16
Half Marathon Long Beach, CA Oct 9, 2021 1:45:30
Marathon Los Angeles, CA Mar 8, 2020 4:19:08
10K Huntington Beach, CA Dec 15, 2019 52:21
10K Universal City, CA Nov 17, 2019 56:03
5K Universal City, CA Nov 16, 2019 34:08
Half Marathon Los Angeles, CA Nov 9, 2019 2:29:37
10K Huntington Beach, CA Sep 21, 2019 49:59

My Raves

If you love a cool breeze, beautiful coastal views, and steady hills, you’ll love the Carlsbad Half Marathon. Expo / pick-up: -This year’s expo and pick-up was at the Holiday … MORE

If you love a cool breeze, beautiful coastal views, and steady hills, you’ll love the Carlsbad Half Marathon.

Expo / pick-up:

-This year’s expo and pick-up was at the Holiday Inn Carlsbad. The parking lot was packed. Shirt pick-up was quick and easy in one of the ballrooms, while sponsor exhibits and merch sales were available in the hotel’s outdoor courtyard. I was there within an hour of opening on the first day, and race merch selection was already a bit sparse, especially when it came to sizing. Bummer!

Parking/Pre-race:

– The start area was located along the southwest corner of the Shoppes at Carlsbad, along Marron Road. One of the nice things about staging the start/finish at a mall: all the parking you could ever want. The same applied to port-a-potties as well, plentiful. Gear-check was offered for an additional fee (boo!) but because the staging area is so close to the parking lot, I think it’s just as easy to access stuff from your car. Still, it’s something to keep in mind if you’re relying on alternate modes of transportation. The start corrals were nicely spaced out along Marron Road, and divided by wave numbers and pacing groups.

Course:

-The Carlsbad Half Marathon course is an out-and-back, with Miles 1-2 breaking away from the mall, through some residential areas, and over the 5 Freeway. This early portion feels slightly crowded and has the narrowest paths, including a turnaround where State St and Carlsbad Blvd intersect. This was my least favorite part of the course. The race feels like it REALLY begins at Mile 3, as you finally get to run with lovely views of Carlsbad State Beach. The sun, the water, the sea breeze, everything starts to come together as advertised. Unlike some other coastal runs I’ve done, most of the Carlsbad Boulevard route is elevated above beach-level, so you get an unobstructed view of the water. It’s very nice! There are constant rolling hills every mile or two that make for challenging ups and fun downs. Just before Mile 7, you hit a turnaround that takes you back on a parallel road, so you see much of the same beaches but from the opposite direction. From there, you’re basically re-tracing the first half of the course, with a few minor tweaks including skipping the early turnaround, and ending at the corner of Marron and Monroe.

Scenery/Weather/Support:

-As mentioned above, the scenery is great! Miles 3-10 run along the coast, and the elevated road makes for soothing views. No complaints about hydration, as there were water/Nuun stations every mile or so. Race officials did email us a few days before the race that the official gel supplements had been delayed, so that was a bummer, but not a big deal as I was self-fueling. Crowd support was good, including DJs, local bands, run groups and businesses, and got better as the race extended later into the morning. One thing I noticed during the race was that since runner names were pretty prominent on the race bibs, random supporters could more easily cheer on random runners by name (instead of “Let’s go, Runner 101!”). It’s a fun and unexpected feeling! Race day weather was cool and pleasant, starting in the upper 50s at the start line, and going into the mid-60s by the time I reached the finish line.

Post-race:

-Finish-line goodies were conveniently pre-packaged in brown paper bags—I appreciate this because (1) Covid concerns, (2) faster to grab just one bag instead of stopping at multiple stations, and (3) there have been way too many post-races where I’m stumbling, exhausted, and trying to juggle water and snacks. The refreshments included: bananas, Qure water, Hollandia chocolate milk, Partners sea salt crackers, Chewy granola bar, Dole oranges fruit cup, Organifi drink mix. I also picked up some Suja coconut protein drinks from one of the vendors. Post-race festival outside the Shoppes featured live music, a beer festival, massages, food trucks, and tents for sponsors and merch sales.

Swag:

-The Carlsbad Half Marathon race swag this year was pretty nifty. I liked the finisher medal, featuring just the race’s new, circular red/orange/yellow sunset and blue wave logo in the front. Flip the medal around for the event name, date, and info in silver, all looped with a blue ribbon. Race shirt was a white, long-sleeve tech shirt with the same colorful race logo front and center. Bonus: a black, long-sleeve jacket with a corner chest Carlsbad logo, and thumb-holes in the sleeves. There were a few undone threads on my jacket, but it’s still pretty nice!

Bottom-line:

-The Carlsbad Half Marathon is a really top-notch race, with elevated coastal views, strong production/support, and great energy. I had a great time and can’t wait to run it again!

DIFFICULTY
3
PRODUCTION
4
SCENERY
4
SWAG
5

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The Half Marathon at the San Dimas Holiday Running Festival is a wonderfully jolly run, with a course that’s more challenging than it seems Expo / pick-up: -Race-day bib & … MORE

The Half Marathon at the San Dimas Holiday Running Festival is a wonderfully jolly run, with a course that’s more challenging than it seems

Expo / pick-up:

-Race-day bib & shirt pick-up on Sunday morning was encouraged by the organizers. There were multiple tents set up for info, registration, etc. but I found the pick-up process to be very smooth. Remember to have the QR code they email you a few days before the race. I think you could probably also get your bib early if you also participated in one of the Saturday 5k or 10k races?

Parking:

-This was my first time at this race, and I wish I had gotten there a little earlier because parking at Bonelli Park (a hefty $12!) filled up quickly. I ended up parking along the southeast shore of Puddingstone Lake/Reservoir, and having to trek over half a mile to the start line near the southwest shore. You’d think a runner wouldn’t complain about an extra half mile, but it makes a difference on a super cold morning! The irony is that I avoided hitting the road early because it was so cold, but then I ended up having to spend even more time walking in the cold… 🙁

Pre-race:

-The start/finish area was very organized. There were multiple tents for late registration, information, merch sales, running clubs, vendors, sponsors, bib pick-up, and a stage for music/announcements flanked by a giant blow-up snowman and nutcracker. Port-a-potties were plentiful. Gear check was also convenient. I wish the race website or emails had mentioned the availability of gear check because I mistakenly assumed this was a smaller race that didn’t offer it, but it turned out to be a nice surprise! If you’re in the holiday spirit—and why wouldn’t you be?— you can participate in the costume contest about 30 minutes before the race. The start corral was not chaotic due to a smaller field of racers, and it was really fun being surrounded by so much green and red Christmas cheer. My favorite part of the corral was the start archway that sprinkled snow on runners as we crossed the start line. I’d seen pictures of snow on the race website but thought it was a Photoshop effect. I assure you it’s not, the snowfall is real! It’s a lovely little holiday touch to the race. I wish it stayed “snowing” at the finish line too, but it’s probably easier to prep it one time at the start for all racers, instead of having it blast again and again for several hours at the finish.

Course:

-The Half Marathon course is an out-and-back, with the first 5 miles along running paths in Bonelli Park. This portion of the course is full of rolling hills that are trickier than you’d expect because it’s so scenic. Running in the park, you get great views from multiple vantage points of Puddingstone Lake/Reservoir, and all the birds and early morning sun distract a bit from the hills. Miles 5-8 flatten out and trace the airport and raceway outside the park. The dip in elevation is nice, but the long, straight sightlines here felt like more of a mental slog, especially since gray concrete was replacing the park’s greenery. It’s also here where the out-and-back portions overlap more, and as a result the course grew narrower. Miles 8-12 are the return trip back into Bonelli Park, with many familiar sights. My one nitpick with the course was at around Mile 12.5. You cross a small bridge, and come to a hill—at the top of which you can hear lots of Christmas music blasting at the finish line. Your heart skips a beat and you wonder, wait, is my GPS watch wrong, am I already at the finish? Nope! The course immediately swerves right. You actually have another half mile loop to go, and begin climbing the far edge of the hill that eventually takes you to the finish line. This false sense of hope near the end is a bit demoralizing to an otherwise great course. FYI, they announced that the course is returning to the Pomona Fairplex next year. I’m not sure how much that will differ from this year’s course, but I hope they keep as much of the Bonelli Park portions as possible.

Scenery/Weather/Support:

-As mentioned before, the scenery around the park, especially the views of Puddingstone Lake, can be very soothing. I would normally quibble with an 8 am start, but the unusually chilly morning had me feeling grateful that the race started later than I’d prefer. I counted 3 water stations—each of which you hit twice on an out-and-back course—and it felt like just enough. Maybe one more would’ve been nice. Since the race primarily took place in a park, crowd support was smaller than it would be in a street race, but I was still feeling the love.

Post-race/Swag:

-Cross the finish line, and you’re awarded a nice round medal with a white snow globe design, and a red Christmas tree truck in the middle. The race shirt featured the same Christmas tree truck design, but on a gray cotton shirt—some sort of moisture-wicking tech material would’ve been nicer. Finish-line goodies included a banana, water, chocolate milk, pretzels, and a foil blanket. Nice! If you ran the 5k or 10k the previous day, you also get a Golden Snowflake medal— something I want to grab next year!

Bottom-line:

-I had a great time at this half marathon. It was a lovely and somewhat demanding course, and the overall event had the feel of a local race but the polish of something a little more special. I look forward to doing it again, and taking a shot at the Golden Snowflake Challenge next year!

DIFFICULTY
4
PRODUCTION
4
SCENERY
4
SWAG
4

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The La Jolla Half Marathon can be summed up in one word: hills. And if the hills don’t literally take your breath away, then the gorgeous coastal scenery will. Expo … MORE

The La Jolla Half Marathon can be summed up in one word: hills. And if the hills don’t literally take your breath away, then the gorgeous coastal scenery will.

Expo / pick-up:

-This was my first time racing this course and I opted for race-day bib pick-up, so I can’t comment on the expo experience. On the morning of the race, I was initially worried because our shuttle got to the start line before any of the race organizers had finished setting up. However, once I found the correct tent, I was able to check-in and easily grab my bib and pins. One note: if you do decide on race-day bib pick-up, you won’t receive your race shirt until AFTER the race, so keep that in mind when planning your race attire.

Parking:

-As a point-to-point course, you have the option of parking at the Del Mar Fairgrounds start line, or parking at the La Jolla beach finish line and taking the shuttle to the start. I arrived in La Jolla fairly early so street parking wasn’t an issue, then took the shuttle to the start. The shuttles seemed plentiful, and I think they were going out every 15 minutes or so, from 4:30 to 5:30 am. Organizers also checked racers for masks before boarding the shuttle, so that was nice.

Pre-race:

-The start line location at the Del Mar Fairgrounds had some nice advantages. The fair’s Christmas light displays were festive, and in addition to the race-provided port-a-potties, there were fairground facilities available. The early 6:45 am start-time meant the pre-race temperature was in the chilly 40s! Luckily, one of the fairground’s large exhibit halls was available to runners, and we were able to gather there to stay warm. For gear check, we were provided plastic bags, with bag colors based on our bib numbers, and identified with our bib numbers written in marker. It’s a bit basic, and I worried that any sort of moisture would smudge away the marker-numbers. But it ultimately worked, so I guess I can’t complain. For the start corral, there were no distinct corral separations, we just had to squeeze through the crowd and eyeball your position based on pacer signs.

Course:

-The Half Marathon course kicks off with a winding exit through the fairgrounds, before heading south through Del Mar. The first few miles feature some mini-hills through residential streets that are fairly unremarkable. Right after Mile 4, the fun begins. You race downhill on Torrey Pines Road Bridge with beautiful views of Torrey Pines State Beach on your right. Just before Mile 6, the infamous climb up into Torrey Pines State Park begins, and it’s a doozy. There’s more than 400 feet of elevation gain, and it will really carve up your legs and lungs if you’re not ready. Even when you reach the top, there are still some gentle, shaded hills as you go past the Scripps hospitals and UCSD. After Mile 10, it’s time for the descent. You trade in the shady trees and hills for some coastal views again as you approach the La Jolla boardwalk. It stays pretty flat until a small hill around Mile 13. The logical part of your brain says the hill is nothing compared the gargantuan monster you conquered earlier, though your tired legs will probably disagree because you’re so close to the end! Push past this, and it’s an exciting downhill stretch to the finish line.

Scenery/Weather/Support:

-If you’re used to DJs, bands, cheer squads, and large crowds of sign-toting supporters, this isn’t that kind of race. It’s a quieter race with amazing coastal views and hilly terrain that make for one of the most uniquely scenic courses I’ve ever run. Distractingly gorgeous. Hydration support was adequate. I wish there was a water station immediately at the top of the Torrey Pines State Park climb, but I’m guessing park rules may prevent that. It was a very chilly day, with temperatures going from the 40s into the 50s, but clear overall.

Post-race:

-In addition to a medal, the finish-line goodies included a banana, water, Rx protein bar, chocolate milk, fruit snacks, Hello Panda cookies, pretzels, and an electrolyte drink that was slightly too sodium-heavy for my taste. The post-race festival featured a band, beer festival, and tents for sponsors and merch sales (don’t forget to pick up your shirt and bag now if you did race-day bib pick-up). More importantly, the La Jolla Cove location is hard to beat. Green grass overlooking rocky shores, crashing waves, and some seals along the cove too! If your race ends where a day of world-class sight-seeing begins, I’d say that’s a great spot.

Swag:

-I’m not gonna lie, one of the things that attracted me to this race were the shirt designs from years past that I’ve seen online. This year’s Half Marathon shirt was… well, it’s certainly memorable. I suppose single-color shirts can get boring, but the red/orange/yellow gradient design (With a tree silhouetted in sunset? But it’s a morning race!) is a little more garish than I’d prefer, and not the first thing that comes to mind when I think of Del Mar, Torrey Pines, and La Jolla! The Half Marathon finisher medal is more representative of the San Diego coastal vibes: light blue ribbon, with a yellow surfboard amidst a splashing blue wave, and the local Kiwannis logo.

Bottom-line:

-The La Jolla Half Marathon was not anywhere close to a PR course for me, but that was to be expected with so many hills. What did exceed my expectations were the views along the course and at the finish. Just wonderful. I would do this race again, without question.

DIFFICULTY
5
PRODUCTION
4
SCENERY
5
SWAG
4

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Parking/ Pre-race: -Parking was a tad confusing in the early morning since so many streets were blocked. However, I was able to find a few good spots near Main St … MORE

Parking/ Pre-race:
-Parking was a tad confusing in the early morning since so many streets were blocked. However, I was able to find a few good spots near Main St and Electric, just north of the starting line. A good number of port-a-potties, and plenty of space to gather and stretch along Main Street leading up to Hennessey’s Tavern. Bib pick-up was quick and easy on race-day.

Course:
-The 10k course is basically a double-loop of the 5k: start/finish from Main St, the majority of the miles along Ocean Ave, with a small detour along a beachside park. It’s a very flat course, so there’s some PR potential if you’re willing to dodge the crowds and walkers. There’s one water station around the 2-mile/5-mile mark. Weather was cold and overcast in the 50s, so any pleasant beach views were very muted.

Post-race/Swag:
-Depending on the race distance you signed up for, the official race shirts came in various basic colors like white and navy blue (the 10k). The shirt design was pretty plain, featuring the race logo in the center. I do wish the shirts were a little more Thanksgiving/fall-themed, maybe coming in oranges, browns, or reds, instead of the whites and blues.
The finisher medal is a solid silver design, featuring the race logo (a leaf? turkey feathers?), with the 10k and 5k medals only differing in the colored ribbons attached.
Post-race goodies: bottled water and some free photo opps.

The Bottom Line:
-A good time if you’re looking for a fun Turkey Trot, would recommend!

DIFFICULTY
1
PRODUCTION
4
SCENERY
3
SWAG
3

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A good race, but registration snafus, combined with frustrating course choices and logistics by the organizers chipped away what should have been a great experience. Expo / pick-up: -I’m guessing … MORE

A good race, but registration snafus, combined with frustrating course choices and logistics by the organizers chipped away what should have been a great experience.

Expo / pick-up:
-I’m guessing due to covid concerns, they shifted the expo from the LA Convention Center to Dodger Stadium this year. Prior to entering the expo, you were required to show proof of vaccination or a negative test. Great stuff, thumbs up, I appreciate the focus on health. The outdoor setting made for a more energetic and festive environment, at the cost of more sun. This was fine for bib pickup, but hastened my expo-browsing time.

-The bigger issue was the screw-up over my Double Play (5k + marathon) registration. I was bounced back and forth between the 5k, marathon, and registration tents where they claimed I had registered for the “Double Play”, but not for the 5k separately, which the “Double Play” fee supposedly didn’t include. There were at least 10 other frustrated runners facing the same Double Play-but-not-5k issue as me while I was there. I was running short on time, and faced with growing heat and growing frustration, I felt cornered into paying the extra $40 for the 5k just to move on. I still don’t know whether this was a gross bait-and-switch scam by the organizers at the last minute, or just an awful user-interface design on their website. If it’s the latter, why would you sell something called the “Double Play”, then allow users to check-out and pay if it doesn’t even include both the marathon and 5k that’s advertised? At no point was I ever prompted to add the 5k separately at check-out. By that logic, I should have had to add the marathon separately too, right? It’s like selling a fast-food combo, but then later saying, “Actually, you were supposed to add the fries as a separate order”. WTF!

Parking:
-I was dropped at Dodger Stadium (Golden State Gate) instead of taking the shuttle this year. I liked that this was fast and convenient on race-day morning, and saved me an extra hour of sleep. This is a great option if you’re able to secure transportation after the race from the Century City finish line. Basically, you’ll gain a bit more peace of mind in the morning in exchange for the hassle of navigating the post-race crowds to get a ride.

Pre-race:
-The race organizers frustratingly removed race-day gear check this year, and required gear to be checked at the Expo in the days before the race unless you paid for the Start Line Hospitality package. They ostensibly spun this as a covid precaution, but that doesn’t make sense when thousands of people still need to gather in lines for port-a-potties, snacks, water, etc. before the race, and then bunch up in crowded corrals. It felt like a McCourt Foundation money-grab to upsell the Hospitality package. *SIGH* And they got me. They got me because I wanted to keep wearing my comfy jacket, hat, and warm-ups for as long as possible on a chilly morning until the race started. Sure, the heated Hospitality tent featured chairs, water, coffee, bagels, pastries, bananas, Clif bars, yoga mats, foam rollers, private port-a-potties, and a goodie bag with a LAM blanket and bottle. Nice luxuries, but I could’ve gone without all that. I just wanted race-day gear check. Was it worth it? Probably not. Next time, I might just buy disposable warm-ups, and toss them aside for charity like so many other runners there. It’s frustrating because no matter what, I feel like I’m throwing money away. PLEASE bring back race-day gear check!
-Corrals: I didn’t realize I was supposed to receive a sticker on my bib for my assigned corral, so when I tried to enter, I was denied and told to enter the open corral! At the last minute, I had to hustle back to the registration tent to get a corral sticker, then hustle back in time for my corral. Not a huge deal, but these little registration and logistical issues start to add up, especially since I later found out I didn’t get a Double Play sticker either. Grr…

Course:
-I previously ran the LA Marathon in 2020, in what turned out to be the last time the course included a Santa Monica finish. I vastly prefer the “Stadium to the Sea” course over the new “Stadium to the Stars” course that ends with an out-and-back finish line in Century City. But until the McCourt Foundation and the City of Santa Monica play nice again, we’re stuck with this still-great but not-as-amazing tour of Los Angeles.

-Miles 1-5: Coming out of the gate, it felt like a mad, downhill tumble of humanity, just bodies pouring out of Dodger Stadium. The overall participant field was smaller this year, but the crowded rush out of the starting line is a fantastic feeling that I didn’t know I missed so much over the last 20 months! The first few miles wind through Chinatown, Downtown LA, Little Tokyo, past Olvera Street, the Civic Center, Disney Hall, and the DWP building. This stretch probably features the most buildings, most turns, most (small) hills, and the tightest streets for the course, but it’s very memorable. I loved the taiko drums as you struggle up the hill around Mile 4 on 3rd St!

-Miles 5-10 : After all the Downtown twists and turns, the course settles into a pleasant run through Echo Park and Silver Lake. There’s a big climb to start, then it quickly flattens out into wider streets. There aren’t as many major attractions, but I ran my fastest segments here. There’s something about the cozy, quieter neighborhoods that made for a smooth run.

-Miles 10-15: Hello Hollywood! Welcome to a long, flat, turn-free journey down Hollywood Blvd and Sunset Blvd. The crowds start to get rowdier, music gets louder, and landmarks start to catch your eye: the Pantages Theater, Capitol Records Tower, Grauman’s Chinese Theater, Chateau Marmont… Oh, and it’s not just the buildings, but the endless parade of billboards that remind you you’re in an entertainment town—Eternals! Red Notice! Ghostbusters! Encanto! King Richard! Finch! House of Gucci! Every major movie studio, TV network, and online streamer has shelled out big bucks to be seen here. But remember, just for today, YOU’RE the star! Keep running!

-Miles 15-18: The glamour shifts from billboards to the fancy storefronts and windows of Beverly Hills. The elevation drops a bit, and things get quieter here. This gives you a chance to focus more on your technique, your form, your breathing… and not on the luxury goods you see on Rodeo Drive.

-Miles 18-22: Century City and West LA killed me last year, so I went into this part wary of “The Wall”, but still confident in my training. Around Mile 19, you start to see elite runners returning on the other side of the street from the out-and-back portion. I felt a slight motivation boost seeing all that speed. But once that subsided, the other factors of the out-and-back started creeping up: you see a water station at the other side of the street but you don’t get to drink from it, hills start to take a toll, you begin looking for the turn-around point (Are we there yet? No… Is it around this corner? No… This corner? Still no…). And then your exhausted brain starts yelling, “Wait, we’re running AWAY from the finish line that we saw? This feels wrong!”

-Miles 22-26.2: Finally reaching the Brentwood turn-around point is a huge relief. The crowd support here is an immense boost, and water has never tasted sweeter than it does at the station here. But remember the rough 4 miles you just went through? You get to do it again, buddy, only with legs that are achier and more cramped than before. Brutal. I trudged through on absolute fumes. Was it just my dead-tired imagination, or were there fewer water stations during the last 2 miles?

-Anyway, as much as I dislike the out-and-back, I also wasn’t a fan of the final stretch towards the finish line because it’s such a momentum killer. Running down Santa Monica Blvd, you approach huge crowds and what feels like the finish, and just then the course makes a sharp right-turn onto Avenue of the Stars. You gotta go for another 0.1 mile or so, and the course just… finishes. It feels slightly anti-climactic not being able to see the finish line from a greater distance, so you don’t get to build up speed for that final burst. Instead, you’re forced to slow down for a turn, and THEN you see the finish line right ahead. It just feels weird. I’m probably being nit-picky, but the old Santa Monica finish line felt amazing because you would start smelling the sweet ocean air about a half mile out, hear the crowds, see green palms and blue waters, then your brain would kick into overdrive for a straight sprint to the finish line. For next year, if we can’t get back Santa Monica, I’d recommend shortening the out-and-back by a quarter mile or so, and add that to the Avenue of the Stars after the corner-turn for a speedier finish.

Scenery/Weather/Support:
-There are so many iconic Los Angeles landmarks on this course, it’s hard to ask for more. Weather was perfect, slightly cloudy, starting in the upper 50s and ending in the low 60s. This is one area where a November race beats out the usual March date. Maybe it’s just because I was basically running on an empty tank, and my desperate, thirsty brain was exaggerating the pain, but it felt like there were fewer water/aid stations in the final 3 miles or so? Other than that, water/aid support felt strong throughout.

Post-race:
-The finisher chute along Avenue of the Stars was pretty good. Grab your medal(s), wrap yourself up in a nice foil blanket, and pick up refreshments. My bounty included bananas, Qure water, Teddy Graham crackers, pretzels, Ritz crackers, Cheez-Its (a salty sodium-boost after a race is underrated!), mini Clif bars, peanut butter + cheese crackers, and more! Keep moving, keep munching, keep stretching. I skipped the entertainment and beer garden (presented by Heineken) at the Finish Festival, but it’s a nice option if you want to hang around with friends and family.

Swag:
– The 2021 race shirt came in light gray, with the big new red/teal/blue LA Marathon logo featured in the middle. It’s a nice design, though not as eye-catching as last year’s light blue shirt. I liked how hefty the finisher medal is. It’s a big, round chunk of silver and blue, with the marathon logo up top, and an illustration of LA City Hall, the Hollywood sign, Walt Disney Concert Hall, and Grauman’s Chinese Theatre. I also ran the 5k the previous day, and earned the Double Play medal. It’s a similarly chunky silver medal shaped like a chevron shield, with mini versions of the same LA landmarks along with a mini Dodger stadium. The backs of both medals feature the McCourt Foundation logo, along with a blank spot to etch your finishing time. I’m surprised they didn’t upsell an engraving option for this.

The Bottom Line:
-I had a really great run at the 2021 LA Marathon. I’m not thrilled with the registration snafus (Double Play without the 5k; missing my Double Play, Hospitality, and corral stickers) and course planning (gear check, abandoning Santa Monica, adding an out-and-back, a weird finish line). These are fixable issues, and I hope the race organizers make the proper adjustments because the foundation of the LA Marathon is really strong: great weather, enthusiastic runners, so many iconic landmarks, amazing energy, and unbeatable crowd support throughout the city of Los Angeles. I’m hopeful for an even better race next year.

DIFFICULTY
3
PRODUCTION
2
SCENERY
4
SWAG
3

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A fun, family-friendly race through Elysian Park, and a great tune-up if you’re running the LA Marathon the next day. But beware the hills! Expo / pick-up: -Race-day bib pick-up … MORE

A fun, family-friendly race through Elysian Park, and a great tune-up if you’re running the LA Marathon the next day. But beware the hills!

Expo / pick-up:
-Race-day bib pick-up on Saturday morning was available, and seemed to run smoothly, but I picked up my bib at the expo on Saturday. I’m guessing due to covid concerns, they shifted the expo from the LA Convention Center to Dodger Stadium this year. Prior to entering the expo, you were required to show proof of vaccination or a negative test. Great stuff, thumbs up, I appreciate the focus on health. The outdoor setting made for a more energetic and festive environment, at the cost of more sun. This was fine for bib pickup, but hastened my expo-browsing time.

-The bigger issue was the screw-up over my Double Play (5k + marathon) registration. I was bounced back and forth between the 5k, marathon, and registration tents where they claimed I had registered for the “Double Play”, but not for the 5k separately, which the “Double Play” fee supposedly didn’t include. There were at least 10 other frustrated runners facing the same Double Play-but-not-5k issue as me while I was there. I was running short on time, and faced with growing heat and growing frustration, I felt cornered into paying the extra $40 for the 5k just to move on. I still don’t know whether this was a gross bait-and-switch scam by the organizers at the last minute, or just an awful user-interface design on their website. If it’s the latter, why would you sell something called the “Double Play”, then allow users to check-out and pay if it doesn’t even include both the marathon and 5k that’s advertised? At no point was I ever prompted to add the 5k separately at check-out. By that logic, I should have had to add the marathon separately too, right? It’s like selling a fast-food combo, but then later saying, “Actually, you were supposed to add the fries as a separate order”. WTF.

Parking/ Pre-race:
-Parking was plentiful and free at Dodger Stadium. Lots of port-a-potties, and space to stretch, warm up, and get ready. There were no individual corrals to speak of, but the participant field was small enough that it didn’t matter.

Course:
-The 5k course goes downhill out of Dodger Stadium, onto Stadium Way, through Elysian Park, then up Academy Road, and back into the Stadium. There are more hills than you might expect, so don’t expect a PR on this course.

Scenery/Weather/Support:
-The greenery of Elysian Park made the run very pleasant. Cloudy morning in the upper 50s. One water station about halfway through the course.

Post-race/Swag:
-The official 5k race shirt was light gray, with the red/teal/blue Big 5k logo featured in the middle. Same colors and design template as the official marathon shirt. The finisher medal is a solid silver/blue design, featuring the red/teal Big 5k logo and a background of Dodger Stadium. Post-race goodies: bananas, water, and Clif Bar duos.

The Bottom Line:
-Aside from the Double Play registration issue, this is a solid 5k that I wouldn’t mind running again.

DIFFICULTY
4
PRODUCTION
4
SCENERY
3
SWAG
3

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The Rock ‘n’ Roll San Diego Half Marathon is a fun, high-energy race done right. Outside of Disney events, it’s hard to find many other races with this level of … MORE

The Rock ‘n’ Roll San Diego Half Marathon is a fun, high-energy race done right. Outside of Disney events, it’s hard to find many other races with this level of atmosphere and support.

Expo / pick-up:
-The expo at the San Diego Convention Center was well-organized with plentiful, designated bib and shirt pick-up stations, as well as a start-corral adjustment table. I appreciated the vaccine/negative test check at the entrance. So many of us race because of health, and it’s nice that they took this seriously. I also loved the clear pick-up bags we got. They’re so handy for carrying all your race and expo goodies, and necessary for gear drop at the longer races. I don’t understand why some races try to cheap out by not giving these bags. Like most big expos, there’s a spacious area for race weekend merch and the primary shoe sponsor (Brooks this year). My favorite pieces of merch were the 5k/Half/Marathon shirts with all the racers’ names printed on them in alphabetical order—the catch being that you had to have registered for the races at least 60 days early. I wish I’d registered earlier, and this neat little perk is something the Rock ‘n’ Roll organizers should advertise more! The San Diego version of the Rock ‘n’ Roll running events is apparently the original, and the expo set up a neat display of all the medal designs throughout the years, as well as all the bonus medals you can earn for completing multiple Rock ‘n’ Roll races. They’re so bling-tastic and do a good job of appealing to all the medal-collecting completionists out there 🙂

Parking:
-Convention center parking for the expo was unfortunately $20. I tried finding cheaper alternatives, but couldn’t find anything more reasonable. For race day, I went with the race-recommended Spot Hero app, and found $20 parking that was a few blocks from the finish line, but a bit farther from the start line. It wasn’t a big deal because so many other runners were also making the same trek to the start line, so every few blocks this long parade of runners would grow.

Pre-race:
-The start line begins at 6th Ave and Quince St, but once you get close to 6th Ave and Laurel St/the El Prado Bridge, the music starts kicking in and the port-a-potty lines emerge (hallelujah!). Gear check was a breeze—remember to bring the clear bags and zip ties from the expo. Just like the 5k from the previous day, runners were divided into multiple corrals—at least 25 corrals, marked by giant guitar picks (get it? Rock and roll?). One implementation I really admired was the staggered corral starts. Most races will release entire corrals are released at once. Then you’re expected to cross the start line on your own timing, and end up navigating a congested, slow-mo stampede from the start? The Rock ‘n’ Roll organizers solved this issue by releasing runners in each corral in 5-sec mini-waves, signaled by countdown lights and horns. This way, you can launch out of the start line into a more wide-open road! I hope this practice becomes more commonplace.

Course:
-The Half Marathon course primarily winds around Balboa Park, through North Park, Normal Heights, and East San Diego, then back to Balboa and Downtown. I think the elevation change can be best described as gentle rolling hills, with a few bigger hills sprinkled throughout—nothing too extreme. The first “big” hill was around mile 3. It thinned the crowds a bit, but I think it came early enough in the course that I felt fresh enough to speed through. The hills before and after mile 10, right as you re-enter the northeast corner of Balboa Park, caught me a bit off guard. They weren’t huge by any means, but tired legs at that point made them a chore! The good news? It’s all pretty much downhill (literally) from that point on! You zoom south through Balboa towards downtown—and with the downhill slope combined with the mental momentum of knowing you’re in the final stretch, it makes for an exciting finish.

Scenery/Weather/Support:
-With a name like “Rock ‘n’ Roll” in the event name, you’d think that music would be important to the race. And you’d be right! There’s plenty of on-course entertainment, including multiple bands and DJs, a drag show, a Johnny Cash tribute, cheer squads, a Ron Burgundy impersonator (I almost slowed down to hear more jokes), and a pretty nifty disco tunnel around mile 12! Water support was strong throughout the course. I think there were port-a-potties, but I was too locked-in to notice. Weather-wise, it was a cool and cloudy day, but not as overcast as it was for the previous day’s 5k, and not cloudy enough to dampen the overall energy of the race.

Post-race:
-Once you cross the finish-line, grab your finisher medal and a great selection of refreshments: water, banana, multiple brands of granola bars, a fresh cookie, chips (salt is an underrated part of recovery!), Gatorade, fruit snacks, and more. You definitely won’t go hungry. Runners are funneled several blocks down Ash St towards the waterfront finish festival. I have to say the finish festival is one of the more impressive ones I’ve seen. There’s an alphabetized family reunion area, gear pick-up, food trucks, photo opportunities, merchandising, Remix Challenge medal pick-up (if you did the 5k), medal engraving, and pick-up plenty of space to cool-down and stretch. All this while music blasts to keep you on your feet if you need. It’s a really festive mood, and the sights are great too because you’re just along the water with several ships sitting in the harbor.

Swag:
-The Half Marathon was a dark blue tech shirt, with multiple San Diego neighborhood signs highlighted in yellow and orange. It’s not as eye-catching as the 5k shirt, but it’s still very nice. The Half Marathon medal is a round replica of the North Park sign in light-blue, with a bright orange ribbon attached. It’s only slightly larger than the 5k medal, which is something I hope they change in the future. If you run the 5k as well, then you’ll get your hands on a Remix Challenge medal: the medal features a record that actually slides in and out of its sleeve! Way cool. Both medals have an outlined area on the back for engraving if you want to record your time or celebrate a PR.

Bottom-line:
-This was my first Rock ‘n’ Roll running weekend, and I had a really great time. The race was well-produced, and full of little details (guitar pick corral signs, corral mini-waves, on-course entertainment, a disco tunnel, an expansive finish line festival, etc.) that set it apart. Rock ‘n’ Roll San Diego’s got a great energy that really makes you want to run it again.

DIFFICULTY
3
PRODUCTION
5
SCENERY
4
SWAG
4

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The Rock ‘n’ Roll San Diego 5k is a wonderful trip through Balboa Park, and worth running whether it’s your main event or as a warm-up for one of the … MORE

The Rock ‘n’ Roll San Diego 5k is a wonderful trip through Balboa Park, and worth running whether it’s your main event or as a warm-up for one of the weekend’s other races!

Expo / pick-up:
-The expo at the San Diego Convention Center was very well-organized with plentiful, designated bib and shirt pick-up stations, as well as a start-corral adjustment table. I appreciated the vaccine/negative test check at the entrance. So many of us race because of health, and it’s nice that they took this seriously. I also loved the clear pick-up bags we got. They’re so handy for carrying all your race and expo goodies, and necessary for gear drop at the longer races. I don’t understand why some races try to cheap out by not giving these bags. Like most big expos, there’s a spacious area for race weekend merch and the primary shoe sponsor (Brooks this year). My favorite pieces of merch were the 5k/Half/Marathon shirts with all the racers’ names printed on them in alphabetical order—the catch being that you had to have registered for the races at least 60 days early. I wish I’d registered earlier, and this neat little perk is something the Rock ‘n’ Roll organizers should advertise more! The San Diego version of the Rock ‘n’ Roll running events is apparently the original, and the expo set up a neat display of all the medal designs throughout the years, as well as all the bonus medals you can earn for completing multiple Rock ‘n’ Roll races. They’re so bling-tastic and do a good job of appealing to all the medal-collecting completionists out there 🙂

Parking:
-Convention center parking for the expo was unfortunately $20. I tried finding cheaper alternatives on Spot Hero, but couldn’t find anything more reasonable. Race-day parking at Balboa Park, though, was FREE at the Inspiration Point lot. The best part is that the parking lot is less than a 5-minute walk to the start corral. Nice!

Pre-race:
-Speakers loudly blast all sorts of music to keep the energy up. An engaging emcee. Plentiful port-a-potties. Runners were divided into multiple corrals—I counted at least 8 corrals, marked by giant guitar picks (get it? Rock and roll?). You know how at some races, entire corrals are released at once? Then you’re expected to cross the start line on your own timing, and end up navigating a congested, slow-mo stampede? The organizers solved this issue by releasing runners in each corral in 5-sec mini-waves, signaled by countdown lights. This way, you can launch out of the start line into a more wide-open road! I hope this practice becomes more commonplace.

Course:
-Mile 0-1: The race starts near the Veterans Museum, and the first mile takes you past Spreckels Organ Pavilion, Plaza de Panama, Museum of Art, and the highlight: crossing Cabrillo Bridge shortly after sunrise.
-Mile 1-2: The second mile loops around Marston Point, where the scenery shifts from pretty architecture to pretty greenery. A few small hills also begin testing your legs at this point, and the crowds start to thin if you can keep your pace.
-Mile 2-3.1: You briefly exit the actual park and run along the streets with some shops on your left and the NW border of Balboa Park on the right. Then, the course turns back into the park for the final stretch down to the finish line!

Scenery/Weather/Support:
-A nice mini-tour of Balboa Park, but it was an overcast day, so the best tourist attractions were shrouded in clouds—not as picturesque as you may like. In terms of aid, I only remember one water station. That felt like enough, but I haven’t run very many 5ks, so I’m not sure if that’s normal or not. Lots of volunteers, a cheer squad, a DJ on the first mile, and the overall energy was great.

Post-race:
-Grab your typical post-race goodies of banana, granola bar, and water. Nothing too special, and nothing to complain about. There’s a Heineken beer garden too if you need some extra carbs. Finish Line photographers are available if you’re ready to pose with your medal.

Swag:
-The 5k race shirt was a light blue tech shirt, with ginormous yellow “5K” lettering on the front so no one can mistake what race you’re running. Silhouettes of Balboa Park and palm trees fill in the lettering—very nicely-done and it’s a shirt I’d wear anytime. The 5k medal is a colorful, blue-orange replica of Balboa Park’s Museum of Us and the museum’s iconic California Tower. The medal is on the smaller side, but it’s still really nice. There’s an outlined area on the back for engraving if you want to record your time or celebrate a PR.

Bottom-line:
-This was my first Rock ‘n’ Roll running event, and it was a great race that I would definitely do again, hopefully on a sunnier day!

DIFFICULTY
2
PRODUCTION
5
SCENERY
4
SWAG
4

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This was my second time running the Half at Long Beach, and it was a blast! Really great environment, smooth and beautiful course, and a new personal best for me! … MORE

This was my second time running the Half at Long Beach, and it was a blast! Really great environment, smooth and beautiful course, and a new personal best for me! Yes! The race organizers also did a great job with vaccine/testing requirements, and held the expo outside this year, which definitely felt safer. The course was the same as previous years, and can be divided roughly into four parts.

-Miles 1-5: the thickest crowds as you navigate twisty roads, multiple turnarounds, and go over and under bridges. The bridge here is the only significant elevation change on the course, so it was kinda nice to get it out of the way early.
-Miles 5-7: all the touristy landmarks including the Aquarium, Shoreline Park, and views of the Queen Mary. This was probably my favorite portion of the race since all the sights made the run easier!
Miles 7-10: in theory, a straight, long stretch along the beach can be soothing, with all that pretty sand and water on your right. But in reality, seeing the same exact sight for multiple miles gets boring real fast. This segment was also the least shaded, provided the least aid support, and had the fewest crowds cheering you on. In my previous race, I suffered the most here, but I think the earlier start time and cooler weather this year made it more bearable.
-Miles 10-13: rounding onto Ocean Blvd, the crowds and aid stations are back. You’re in the city again, in the shade again, with all the local businesses and residents out to support you! I really got a kick of energy during this stretch, and I felt pumped all the way down to the finish line.

-Post-race: a nice-looking medal, your usual combo of snacks (banana, chocolate milk, protein bar, water) and a beer festival if you’re up for it. Organizers and volunteers were really pleasant and helpful!

-Things to improve? I do wish there were more aid stations, especially along the beach stretch. I also was NOT a fan of the shirt this year, going with a cheaper cotton/poly blend (same as Surf City this fall, another Motiv race…). What and WHY? Cotton shirts are an absolute “no” during long runs, and soak up sweat so much easier. These shirts also felt flimsier than your usual tech shirts. Hopefully this changes next year.

All in all, a really great race that I would recommend.

DIFFICULTY
3
PRODUCTION
4
SCENERY
4
SWAG
3

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A holiday fun run where you raise money for charity? And a chance to run in a Santa-styled running shirt or a Santa suit? That sounds like a great recipe … MORE

A holiday fun run where you raise money for charity? And a chance to run in a Santa-styled running shirt or a Santa suit? That sounds like a great recipe for a joyous Christmas race! Unfortunately, I only had a so-so experience instead of a jolly, ho-ho-ho time.

Pick-up/Pre-race:
-The pre-race was well-organized, and full of buzzy holiday energy. However, check-in was the first sign that things weren’t great. Despite my registering well in advance, they ran out of Santa running shirts in my size. I was given a shirt one size too large, which didn’t fit at all. They gave me a Santa suit instead, but the suit fell apart on me less than halfway through the race—the belt tore apart, and I had to run with a suit that was flapping in the wind, slowing me down.

Course:
-The course is a nice, flat out-and-back route along the sand in Huntington Beach. The Christmas-at-the-beach vibes and views are great, but it’s not a 100% closed course, so I had to dodge non-runners a few times. It was also hotter than usual for December, and it didn’t help that the race didn’t start until 8 am, giving time for the sun to heat up. Water support was fine, just enough for a hot day.

Post-race:
-Nice festive environment in the post-race, great holiday music, and a few food/coffee trucks for extra refreshments.

Swag:
-The medal is nicely-done, in the shape of a green gift box with red ribbons. The aforementioned too-large Santa shirt was an inexplicably pale pink. I’m not sure why a Santa shirt isn’t a jolly, bright red. I wouldn’t even mind pink if it was a cute, thoughtful pink hue, but this one just looked like a red shirt that was left out in the sun too long, and sun-washed into a faded pink. I’m not even gonna get into the poor-quality Santa suit that disintegrated on me.

Bottom-line:
-On paper, this should’ve been a great holiday fun-run, but in execution, the race was less than ideal for me. The poor/inadequate shirts, followed by a late start and hot weather made for a frustrating experience… These are all very fixable, so I don’t want to be too harsh on a charity-run, but I probably won’t be back for another go.

DIFFICULTY
1
PRODUCTION
2
SCENERY
3
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3

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If you’re looking for a great, themed fun 10k, then the Running Universal Jurassic World 10k is just for you! I did the 5k the day before, but the Jurassic … MORE

If you’re looking for a great, themed fun 10k, then the Running Universal Jurassic World 10k is just for you! I did the 5k the day before, but the Jurassic World medals are so cool that I just HAD to do the challenge to grab all 3!

-Pre-race, pickup: No real expo, but packet pickup was at the Universal Citywalk parking garage, which was well-organized, and included some nice Jurassic photo ops.

-The course: Despite being double the length, the fun Universal Studios Hollywood portions of the 10k race were roughly the same as the 5k: through the entrance gates, right by Hogwarts Castle, past the Jurassic Park ride, then through the Studio Tour areas as well as some backstage portions you don’t normally get to see. To get to 10k, the extra segments of the race are a tiny bit more of the backstage, but most of the extra miles are tacked on through a hilly road right outside the park (running uphill with a rising sun in your eyes isn’t fun…) and then through the Citywalk parking lot (!). This was the least pleasant part of the race, with elevation gains and lots of drab concrete. I wish the 10k course added more through the backstage instead of this route, or at the very least populate this area with more photo ops and theming.

-Post-race: As with the 5k, you get your usual grab-bag of water and snacks, but the finish line is in a festive environment in Universal Citywalk. There are great photo ops with some Velociraptor statues too! The 10k medal is a terrific-looking Indominus Rex medal that’s heavy, detailed, and looks fierce. If you completed the 5k + 10k, then you’ll also get a Velociraptor Challenge medal as well. That tail is sharp!

-Wishlist: The 10k shirt design is the iconic Jurassic Park logo, but printed on a drab light gray tech shirt. I’m not a fan of gray, but I’m probably nit-picking. I also wish there were more photo ops along the course, especially along the road/parking garage section of the course. I’d love to see more characters and maybe even some of the “live” dinosaurs like Blue and the triceratops that show up in the park.

-The Bottom Line: If you’re a fan of themed fun runs, or a fan of Jurassic Park/World, the 10k is a great race, but a bit more challenging and less fun than the 5k.

DIFFICULTY
3
PRODUCTION
4
SCENERY
4
SWAG
5
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Ever since Run Disney paused (ended?) their events at Disneyland, there was a real costume-sized hole in my runner heart. I was so happy to see Universal fill in that … MORE

Ever since Run Disney paused (ended?) their events at Disneyland, there was a real costume-sized hole in my runner heart. I was so happy to see Universal fill in that void, especially since Jurassic Park is one of my favorite movies ever.

-Pre-race, pickup: No real expo, but packet pickup was at the Universal Citywalk parking garage, which was well-organized, and included some nice Jurassic photo ops.

-The course: This is a nice, fun run that takes you through Universal Studios Hollywood: through the entrance gates, right by Hogwarts Castle, past the Jurassic Park ride, then through the Studio Tour areas as well as some backstage portions you don’t normally get to see. The backstage areas are surprisingly hilly, so do be prepared for that, but cheering Universal cast members were so encouraging with their support. It was surreal seeing so many runners dressed as Drs. Alan Grant, Ellie Sattler, and Ian Malcolm, as well as a couple dino costumes. As always, Jurassic Park >> Jurassic World! There were a handful of photo ops with John Hammond, Ian Malcolm, and some dinos and vehicles, but I do wish there were more. Between the crowds, hills, and photo-ops, don’t expect a PR, just enjoy it!

-Post-race: You get your usual grab-bag of water and snacks, but the finish line is in a really festive environment in Universal Citywalk that puts a smile on your face. There are a couple great photo ops with some Velociraptor statues too! The medal? Incredible-looking Tyrannosaurus Rex medal for the 5k. Seriously, it’s heavy, detailed, and impressive. I have no idea how they plan to one-up the medals in future years, but I look forward to it.

-Wishlist: The 5k shirt design of a T-rex is a nice blue color, but the cotton material is less than ideal, and the print is already starting to fade a bit. I also wish there were more photo ops along the course, with more characters and maybe even some of the “live” dinosaurs like Blue and the triceratops that show up in the park. The only on-course dinos I remember are from the Lost World section of the Studio Tour.

-The Bottom Line: If you’re a fan of themed fun runs, or a fan of Jurassic Park/World, this is a must-do!

DIFFICULTY
2
PRODUCTION
5
SCENERY
5
SWAG
5
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