My Profile

@racetravelrepeat

Kansas City, MO Raving since 2022 50 States hopeful/finisher Active 2 months, 1 week ago

About Me

  • Running club(s):
  • Rave race:
  • Race that's calling my name:
  • I run because:

    There is always a place to go, and a terrible urgency to get there.

My Races

Organize, track & review your races and personal bests here.

50 States Map
image/svg+xml FL TX NM AZ AK CA NV UT CO OR WA ID HI OK MT WY ND SD NE KS MN IA MO AR LA MS AL GA SC IL WI MI IN OH TN KY NC WV VA PA NY ME VT NH RI CT NJ DE MD MA DC

Half Marathon

Marathon

Ultramarathon

(Marathon or Ultra) + Half

Marathon + Ultra

Other

Future Races

Future Races (5)

Race Distance Location Date Paid
Half Marathon Las Vegas, NV Feb 26, 2023
Half Marathon Virginia Beach, VA Mar 19, 2023
Half Marathon Russellville, AR Apr 22, 2023
Half Marathon Two Harbors, MN Jun 17, 2023
Half Marathon Bird-in-Hand, PA Sep 8, 2023

Past Races (17)

Race Distance Location Date Result My Raves My Performance
Half Marathon Council Bluffs, IA Oct 22, 2022
Half Marathon Fort Collins, CO Aug 6, 2022
Half Marathon Anchorage, AK Jun 18, 2022
Half Marathon Chicago, IL May 22, 2022
Half Marathon Omaha, NE Apr 16, 2022
Half Marathon Liberty, MO Mar 26, 2022
15K Chicago, IL Nov 8, 2020
Half Marathon Manhattan, KS Sep 7, 2020
10K Manhattan, KS Sep 22, 2019
Half Marathon Olathe, KS Apr 13, 2019
Half Marathon Shawnee, KS Nov 18, 2018
Half Marathon Overland Park, KS Nov 11, 2018
Half Marathon Lawrence, KS Nov 4, 2018
5K Manhattan, KS Aug 4, 2018
Marathon Arlington, VA 2011
Marathon Oceanport, NJ 2007
Marathon Oceanport, NJ 2006

My Raves

This race took place on October 22, 2022 on the Historic Wabash Trace Nature Trail. The trail is a part of the Rails-to-Trails conservancy Hall of Fame, and is a … MORE

This race took place on October 22, 2022 on the Historic Wabash Trace Nature Trail. The trail is a part of the Rails-to-Trails conservancy Hall of Fame, and is a gorgeous race venue that was hand-selected by our fearless race directors, who are themselves avid trail runners, Graig and Katie Skartvedt. I had the pleasure of meeting Graig and Katie at packet pick-up, and they were as excited to greet each runner as they were inviting and friendly, making us feel like we were part of their family, especially those of us who had traveled from out of town for the race.

Each of the three Yippee-Ki-Yay events — organized by Happy Trailz Running and Run Nebraska —were an out and back route on the Wabash Trace Nature Trail. Although this race was only in its third year, it was spectacularly well organized, from pre-race communication to race day execution, and it was obvious to me that this event is something that has been bringing the local running community in the Omaha area together and will continue to grow and become even better with each year.

According to my weather app, it was 48° F at the start of the race, with an expected high of 70° F, and 6 MPH wind, absolutely ideal race conditions. The 2022 Participant Guide emailed to each of us from Race Co-Director Katie outlined the course and race day expectations, explaining that the course began with a “gentle uphill” for approximately the first 6 miles of the half marathon, and finished with a gradual downhill for the remainder of the course, which was expected to set runners up for a very “enjoyable downhill finish” for the last half of the race. Some of us joked that the course was actually “uphill both ways” because the downhill was so imperceptible, while the uphill felt obvious. Nonetheless, it was a beautiful race through an endless canopy of fall foliage, beloved by every runner, and touted the past three years as Iowa’s number one fastest average 50K finisher course.

The course started at the Iowa West Foundation Trail Head in Council Bluffs, stretched just beyond the town of Silver City, Iowa, and then doubled back to the start/finish line in Council Bluffs. Most of the walnuts that had fallen on the ground prior to race day had been collected by volunteers as they prepared the course — however, that did not preclude walnuts from falling from the trees during the race, and I narrowly avoided being pelted by a sudden deluge of walnuts falling from the canopy of trees while I was completing mile 9. Because the field of runners was fairly small — 180 runners for all three events — it was a very uncrowded course, and there were periods during the race where I was alone on the trail without another runner in sight for miles. This made for a very laid-back, almost meditative atmosphere.

There was a generous 9 hour time limit for all of the races, with all events concluding at 5 P.M. The course surface consisted of a very fine crushed limestone, and knowing this in advance, I opted to wear my road shoes, which were recommended. The turn-around point was at the 6.58 mile mark, where a photographer and course monitors waited for us.

After taking a look at the Athlete Guide, I had asked the race organizers for a bit of clarification on the aid stations, so I could determine what hydration system and how much additional fluid I would need to bring. I ended up bringing my Camelbak hydration system, filled with 0.5 liters of water on race morning, and that seemed to be just enough coupled with the fluid I got at the aid stations.

When we crossed the finish line, a generous array of snacks, food, and beverages were waiting for us at the shelter across the street, including delicious homemade chicken soup that many runners enjoyed. My stomach was still doing somersaults which began somewhere between mile 10 and 11, so although I opted to forego the chicken soup, everyone who partook in it said it was delicious and just the right thing for a chilly October morning. I snacked on potato chips and began rehydrating with water and Gatorade while admiring my unique wooden finisher medal, which was very “Iowa.”

In the months leading up to the race, Yippee-Ki-Yay Races announced that they would be entering military veteran participants into a special drawing for an awesome race kit bundle if registrants selected that they were a military veteran during registration. I was pleasantly surprised to learn that I was drawn as the Military Veteran Bundle Winner. Included in my special bundle was a free pair of OOFOS recovery sandals from Fleet Feet, BOCO Gear hat with the race logo, large BOCO Gear bag, Keiser Farms tumbler, BOCO Gear headband, a pair of athletic socks, and a large fleece with the race logo. All in all, a successful race weekend.

DIFFICULTY
2
PRODUCTION
5
My Report
SCENERY
5
SWAG
5
My Media

1 member marked this review helpful. Agree?

The Fort Collins Human Race lined up perfectly with my schedule, as I was booked to stay in Denver, Colorado, for a week for a professional conference. The race was … MORE

The Fort Collins Human Race lined up perfectly with my schedule, as I was booked to stay in Denver, Colorado, for a week for a professional conference. The race was at the end of my trip, which gave me a week to get acclimated and ensure I was adjusted to the altitude. This race, celebrating its 39th year, took place on August 6th, 2022.

According to my weather app, it was 68° F at the start of the race, with an expected high of 77° F, and no wind. These conditions were a bit warmer than what I’d normally consider ideal for a half marathon, but it did not seem like it would be terrible since there was no humidity and no wind. What ended up actually happening as far as the temperature was an entirely different story, because the temperature on the course was an average of 84° F and we experienced blistering hot temps that at one point reached 95° F according to my Garmin – which is unseasonably hot for Fort Collins even in August.

Green Events Colorado, the race organizers, touted this race as “a beautiful, scenic and mostly shady, relatively flat course.” I concur with all but the “mostly shady” part, because my experience was the opposite. The course was in fact very beautiful, and mostly flat, but it consisted of sun, heat and elemental exposure most of the time, with the exception of a few shady patches that provided much relief from the sweltering, unobstructed sun on that hot, cloudless day. This would have been an extremely delightful, wonderful race course in the fall, with autumn temperatures and fall foliage.

The race began and ended on Mountain Avenue at Civic Center Park, and we started the course heading west on Mountain Avenue precisely at 7:00 A.M. What was most surprising to me was how small this race was. For a race in its 39th year, I expected a fairly decent crowd, but the field of runners was only 130 for the half marathon, and maybe 200 runners all together for all three events that morning. There was no crowd support, it was only runners and a small group of enthusiastic volunteers cheering one another on throughout the course.

From Mountain Avenue we headed to Grandview, then north on Taft Hill Road to the Poudre River Trail. This course was net downhill overall, and I was extremely delighted to find the first 2 miles were a nice gradual downhill mostly in the shade of downtown Fort Collins. I can’t remember a single uphill throughout the course – it was either flat, or downhill. I was mindful of my breathing, maintaining a really good pace considering the conditions, and I had the goal of simply completing the race, enjoying the scenery, and not going to the hospital for heat exhaustion or dehydration. I was feeling really good until we got onto the trail, and we were exposed to the heat and sun the rest of the course as the morning progressed.

Just before the trail went under Timberline road, there was a turnaround for the course at mile 9. At some point after mile 10, I hit the fork in the road, and went the wrong direction because it was not properly marked, and there were no other runners in sight to point us in the right direction. I was with a volunteer who was equally as confused, and we walked about a quarter mile off course, which of course added extra time to my finish. At that point I considered my finish time a wash, and felt I would be lucky to just finish and not go to the hospital, as symptoms of heat exhaustion started to creep in.

At each of the aid stations I pounded 3 to 4 cups of water and 1 cup of electrolyte mix, but it didn’t feel like enough, even after hydrating all week. I was kicking myself for not bringing my own hydration system to supplement what was offered on the course. Typically I am accustomed to water about every 2 miles with larger races, but because this was a smaller race, the course was a bit less supported. Each aid station had water, Nuun electrolyte drink, and first aid supplies. Portable toilets were also located at the aid stations, though I didn’t take the time to actually notice them or need them because I was focused on hydration.

At the finish line, a photographer snapped high-quality free finisher photos, which were available for download after the race on the event Facebook page. Because I traveled from out of town, race day packet pickup was my best option. I arrived about 50 minutes prior to the race, and picked up my packet, which consisted of my race bib, a cotton tank top with the race logo, electrolyte mix, and some business cards and pamphlets for local businesses. All of this was neatly folded into a disposable paper bag, in keeping with the theme of a “green event.” There was no gear check, so I had to make a decision and discard what I couldn’t run with.

Overall I was surprised with how small this race was, though I suspect prior to the pandemic, this was an event that used to have a fairly decent turnout. I was happy to check Colorado off my list in my quest to run a half in all 50 states.

DIFFICULTY
3
PRODUCTION
3
SCENERY
2
SWAG
2

Was this review helpful?

The race took place on Saturday, June 18, 2022. Every Summer Solstice, this event draws hundreds of runners and spectators from every state, and from many countries around the globe. … MORE

The race took place on Saturday, June 18, 2022. Every Summer Solstice, this event draws hundreds of runners and spectators from every state, and from many countries around the globe. After running this race, I understand why. This was by far one of the most beautiful courses I have ever run thus far in my 16 years of running. This was a point-to-point course that started at the ConocoPhillips Soccer Stadium at Kincaid Park and finished at the Delaney Park Strip in downtown Anchorage. The half marathon and full marathon both followed the same route until the groups split off at Eastchester Park. We could not have asked for more ideal weather on race morning – it 55° F, and partly cloudy with a gentle 5 mph breeze. The temperature was expected to remain consistent throughout the event.

My favorite part of the course was definitely the first mile, which took us downhill through a cottonwood forest to the Tony Knowles Coastal Trail, touted as “one of the most beautiful coastal trails in the nation,” which had stunning views as promised. Having a completely downhill first mile set the tone for a positive race right out of the gate. I’m going to throw it out there now that my absolute least favorite part of this course was the fact that the finish line was at the summit of a back-breaking, demoralizing hill. After the first mile through the cottonwood forest, the 8 miles after that followed along Cook Inlet with amazing views of the Alaska Range. The entire course remained at approximately 102 feet above sea level, with slightly varying elevation through out and some significant uphill portions, however it was not what one would consider a high elevation race.

The support for this course was top-notch. The volunteers were energetic and kept us hydrated, and laughing with funny signs, most notably, “Pain is just the French word for bread.” Speaking of bread: One of the key things I also wanted to highlight was the amazing post-race food. And I do mean amazing. I can tell you from experience that after running this race, I consumed what was the best grilled cheese I’ve ever had, and I’ve had thousands of grilled cheeses throughout my lifetime.

This race was awesome and lived up to every expectation. If I wasn’t a 7 hour flight away, I’d run this race every year.

DIFFICULTY
3
PRODUCTION
5
My Report
SCENERY
5
SWAG
3

3 members marked this review helpful. Agree?

I was very intentional in choosing the Chicago Spring Half Marathon for my Illinois race during my 50 states quest because I love big cities, and I wanted to experience … MORE

I was very intentional in choosing the Chicago Spring Half Marathon for my Illinois race during my 50 states quest because I love big cities, and I wanted to experience one of the bigger races with thousands of runners in one of America’s biggest metropolitan areas. It’s a completely different type of excitement and energy. This race absolutely exceeded every expectation.

The race started and finished on Monroe and Columbus Drive in Maggie Daley Park, which is traditionally where the Hoka Chicago Half Marathon in the fall starts and finishes. The course consisted of a one-loop half marathon course through Chicago’s historic and scenic museum campus alongside Soldier Field, finishing at Maggie Daley Park. Most of the course traveled along Chicago’s Lakefront Trail, which the race advertises as “extremely flat, fast and incredibly scenic.” I agree with the “incredibly scenic” part, however, “extremely flat” is debatable. The scenery along the course was breathtaking, giving way to stunning views of the Chicago skyline and Lake Michigan… but it was definitely no walk in the park! Some of the little hills that snuck in were super unexpected!

Along the race route, we had the opportunity to see some of the renowned Chicago sights and attractions— such as the Navy Pier near the starting line, running on the trails that run alongside Lake Shore Drive southward down to the race turnaround point, passing the Field Museum, Shedd Aquarium and Soldier Field, which is the home of the National Football League’s Chicago Bears. For the first 6 miles, we stayed on the Lakefront Trail and headed south along Lake Michigan to the turnaround point at Morgan Point, which looks out onto Morgan Shoal. Many runners stopped here to take selfies and photos with their friends in their running group.

The temperature on race morning started out at 53° F, and warmed up to about 58° F by the time I reached the finish line. Throughout the race, there was a gentle breeze at a consistent 7 to 10 mph wind speed – and this was the most PERFECT race weather. Typically this time of year in Chicago – also known as the “Windy City,” – you can expect anything from a torrential downpour to high wind speeds, and “spring time” in Chicago is considered to be the 15 minutes between winter and summer. To say we lucked out with our race day weather is an understatement.

With the 7:00 A.M. race start, runners were required to be in their respective start corrals between 6:30 A.M. and 6:45 A.M. When I first received information from the race organizers about the corrals and wave start, I was a bit apprehensive, since I have heard horror stories from runners participating in other races who did not have a good experience with corrals and wave starts. I was pleasantly surprised to find the corrals and wave starts for the Chicago Spring Half were extremely organized and stress-free.

I can’t say enough about how much I loved the energy of this race, and I’ve nicknamed it “the happiest race on earth” because the volunteers and race organizers were phenomenal and ensured we had an incredibly fun experience. There were flowerpot stations in Maggie Daley Park where you could take home your own potted spring flower arrangement, a post-race buffet for finishers, photo stations and high-quality free race photos included with registration, and many vendors ready to welcome finishers at the Spring Market Finish Festival with treats and swag.

Speaking of swag, this race had some of the best swag I’ve ever received during a packet pick-up/Expo. Whoever put the swag together was very mindful of including items that runners love, such as turkey jerky and electrolyte mix. The finisher’s medal was gorgeous and is one of my new favorites, showcasing the Chicago skyline and Lake Michigan.

I’d definitely plan another trip just to run this race again.

DIFFICULTY
1
PRODUCTION
5
My Report
SCENERY
5
SWAG
5
My Media

1 member marked this review helpful. Agree?

This race took place on April 16, 2022, and the Omahalf was celebrating its 5th year. I decided I could easily knock out Nebraska this year on my 50 states … MORE

This race took place on April 16, 2022, and the Omahalf was celebrating its 5th year. I decided I could easily knock out Nebraska this year on my 50 states quest, since it was just a three hour drive from me. This particular race, at the time of this writing, is considered a small business, and if you prefer the smaller races to the races that have a more big-city feel with tens of thousands of runners, this might be one to consider.

There were only approximately 800 runners that registered. I am sure as the years continue on and the race gets better and better, it will continue to grow and attract more runners. I did appreciate this being a smaller race, and I was super excited to connect with so many other out of state runners who were also running the 50 states.

The start/finish and venue for packet pick-up were all located in Aksarben Village, and I later learned the fun fact that “Aksarben” is Nebraska spelled backwards. The race organizers included this fun fact in their last email to us that included the race day logistics. Aksarben Village is home to many shops, restaurants, hotels, and of course Stinson Park, where the race started and finished. My favorite thing about this race was that everything was super convenient, in keeping with the race’s motto of “Run simple.”

The temperature that morning was a balmy 28° F with 15 MPH wind, and it was not forecasted to get above 35° F by the time we would be finished with the race. None of us felt prepared, and I myself had been debating shorts or leggings nearly all night long the night before. I was so thankful I decided at the last minute to wear leggings instead of shorts, and even more thankful I also opted for gloves and a fleece ear warming headband.

The race started and finished in Stinson Park at Aksarben Village. This provided easy access to the West Papio trail system, and the course itself was out and back on the Keystone Trail. The course was fairly flat, though my only complaint is that on portions of the trail the sidewalk sloped slightly at a sideways angle for several miles. The slight angle of the sidewalk became more noticeable as I felt a slight pain in my left hip around mile 5, and this may not have been noticeable or bothersome at all to others, however I definitely felt the difference when the sidewalk flattened out and I got relief.

There wasn’t much as far as scenery, it was all unplanted corn fields to one side, and Papio Creek on the other. I could see some industrial development occasionally peeking out on either side, and at one point there was even a glimpse of a neighborhood in the distance. The biggest concern I had was that this course was bitterly cold and windy, and the cross winds on the trail were absolutely brutal after reaching the turnaround point and then running against the wind direction. Although I was wearing a long-sleeve shirt, and high-waisted leggings, I still somehow ended up with gnarly wind burn on my abdomen, and of course my face was red and splotchy from wind burn like I had spent a day at the beach. Wearing sunscreen moisturizer really didn’t do my skin any favors that morning… I would have been better off wearing a balaclava.

Due to the relentless wind (and I do mean it didn’t stop, not even for a second), my time slowed considerably after the turnaround point. Prior to the turnaround, I was set to finish in what I thought would be a PR, but that all went out the window as I fought the arctic blast.

I have to give every single volunteer a lot of credit, since they were out there freezing with us. Whenever we passed an aid station, volunteers were bundled in blankets and fleeces, and they might have even been colder than we were, since we were constantly moving and they were stationary in one spot. So thank you to the volunteers for braving the arctic weather with us.

Overall, this was a good race to check off Nebraska on my list in that everyone was super accommodating and kind, and the race was pretty well organized. I just hated the fact that Mother Nature wasn’t very accommodating. I’d like to do another Nebraska race again at some point… but if you’ve spent any time in the Midwest at all, you’d know the good weather is really the 15 minutes between winter and summer, and you never know what you’re going to get.

DIFFICULTY
3
PRODUCTION
5
My Report
SCENERY
1
SWAG
1

1 member marked this review helpful. Agree?

I ran this race on March 26, 2022. The beautiful, ENORMOUS medal we received for crossing the finish line made signing up for the Liberty Hospital Half Marathon/Jewell 5K worth … MORE

I ran this race on March 26, 2022. The beautiful, ENORMOUS medal we received for crossing the finish line made signing up for the Liberty Hospital Half Marathon/Jewell 5K worth it! Without a doubt, this was the largest medal I’ve ever gotten from any race, and by far one of the most gorgeous. Also, this race boasted some of the most amazing volunteers — I couldn’t stop laughing at the hilarious signs they made that kept us smiling at every aid station!

Race day started out with an outside temperature of a balmy 32° F, and by the end, it was perfect race weather in the high 40’s. This is pretty typical for Missouri during the spring, and having been living in the Midwest for at least the last 10 years, this wasn’t unexpected for me. If you live in a climate that is typically warmer all year round, consider bringing some layers to the start/finish line that you don’t mind shedding during the race.

In looking at some of the reviews of this race online and on social media, and some of the information on the race website, I went into this knowing this wouldn’t be a PR due to the notorious rolling hills this race is very well known for. It was by far the most challenging course I’ve ever run, which made finishing it all that much more rewarding.

The race starts and finishes near the football field at William Jewell College and takes you down a scenic route through downtown Liberty, and some residential streets. I should have known what was coming when I learned the official race hashtag is #whythehillnot. The entire course was RELENTLESS. HILLS. ALL. THIRTEEN. MILES.

For anyone considering running this race, it was extremely well organized, from packet pick-up at the Expo, to all of the logistics, and the atmosphere was super fun. The entire race was so professionally coordinated, I would have never believed this was only its 5th year. AND DID I MENTION THE MEDALS!? Please run this race if for no other reason than to take home one of the legendary dinner plate-sized medals.

DIFFICULTY
5
PRODUCTION
5
SCENERY
3
SWAG
5

1 member marked this review helpful. Agree?