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@wortholomew

Tallahassee, FL Raving since 2020 50 States hopeful/finisher active 4 months ago

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My Races

Organize, track & review your races and personal bests here.

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Half Marathon

Marathon

Ultramarathon

(Marathon or Ultra) + Half

Marathon + Ultra

Other

Future Races

Future Races (0)

Race Distance Location Date Paid

Past Races (19)

Race Distance Location Date Result My Raves My Performance
Marathon Chicago, IL Oct 13, 2019
Half Marathon Wilson, WY Jun 1, 2019
5K Wilson, WY May 31, 2019
Marathon Relay Roanoke, VA Apr 13, 2019
15K Jacksonville, FL Mar 9, 2019
Marathon Little Rock, AR Mar 3, 2019
10K Little Rock, AR Mar 2, 2019
Half Marathon Tallahassee, FL Feb 3, 2019
50K Crawfordville, FL Dec 8, 2018
Marathon Chattanooga, TN Oct 21, 2018
Half Marathon West Yellowstone, MT Jun 9, 2018
Marathon Relay Roanoke, VA Apr 21, 2018
Half Marathon Tallahassee, FL Feb 4, 2018
Marathon Columbus, GA Nov 18, 2017
Marathon Tallahassee, FL Feb 5, 2017
Marathon Tallahassee, FL Feb 7, 2016
50K Crawfordville, FL 2015
Marathon Tallahassee, FL 2015
Half Marathon Tallahassee, FL Feb 2, 2014

My Raves

weet race Chicago! This race was my first attempt at a world major, and it was an amazing experience. While very crowded, as one would expect with 45,000+ runners, race … MORE

weet race Chicago! This race was my first attempt at a world major, and it was an amazing experience. While very crowded, as one would expect with 45,000+ runners, race day seemed to run smoothly. There was a wait for things like security checks or toilets, but it wasn’t too bad. Perhaps the hardest part was standing in the corral, inching forward to the start line as the waves started — but that’s still part of the experience with such a huge race.

Once runners passed the start line, we were seldom alone again. The streets were absolutely packed for much of the 26.2 miles, so there was always someone around to chat or pace with. I read the city was expecting 1.7 million spectators, and while I didn’t exactly conduct a headcount, I wouldn’t be surprised if the crowd came up to or exceeded that number. With so much positive energy, volunteers, DJs/bands, and more along the course, the Chicago Marathon was a blast. I hope to be able to run it again in the future.

Similar to the start, the finish area was crowded with runners and volunteers looking to help them. In short order, runners received their medals, a heatsheet blanket, a beer, and a bag of snack food. I did not attend the post-race party in Grant Park due to the deteriorating weather (cooling off/drizzle) and making other arrangements, but it seemed like a great scene from what I heard.

I cannot speak to parking or race transportation. I stayed in a hotel not far from the festivities and walked. I’ve heard some hotels had shuttles available, but I don’t know firsthand.

* Soak in the atmosphere. There was so much energy on the streets. It was amazing.
* Allow yourself time for the race activities. The expo was packed starting at the entrance with security checks.
* Grab a poster at the expo (at the entrance this year). It’s a great memory, and many people overlooked them or didn’t know they were there.
* If possible, stay in town for a few days before or after the race to explore. * Plan for all of the weather. Race day was almost perfect. It was cool and a bit windy (ha!; Windy City), but I also got a solid sunburn before the clouds came back. It’s been hot and/or rainy in the past.

DIFFICULTY
2
PRODUCTION
5
SCENERY
4
SWAG
5

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At some point during this race, I twirled and gestured on the road like Julie Andrews in the Alps in "The Sound of Music." I'm not sure exactly what that … MORE

At some point during this race, I twirled and gestured on the road like Julie Andrews in the Alps in “The Sound of Music.” I’m not sure exactly what that says about the experience–or me–but this was an absolute blast, and a beautiful one at that.

The Grand Teton Half Marathon is part of Vacation Races’ National Park Series, which mostly features 5Ks and half marathons near national parks. The series encourages folks to be active and to visit our national treasures.

This point-to-point race begins in Wilson, Wyoming, and meanders to the Jackson Hole Golf and Tennis Club along roads, paved trail, and a little bit of dirt. Along the way, there are incredible views of the Teton Range, the Snake River, and the surrounding area. It truly is like running through a postcard — or a 1960s musical.

Overall, the race was well-supported, though the first aid station didn’t come until mile 3. From there, there were aid stations every two miles, with a bonus one at mile 12. Aid stations were stocked with Honey Stinger, water, and sports drink, as well as portable toilets.

Vacation Races hosted a 5K (Friday, May 31) and this half marathon; completing both races earned participants a third medal and more swag for completing the Moose Double. In addition to the races, Vacation Races offers club hikes and a trifecta (think photo scavenger hunt) where participants can earn extra swag for checking out things in and around the park.

This was my second race with Vacation Races, having completed the Yellowstone Half Marathon last year. I’m already looking forward to another one.

* All runners received chocolate milk, fruit, and a box of recovery snacks. Food was available for purchase from the golf club, but I don’t know much about that since I didn’t take part.

* Vacation Races provides some travel tips on its race sites. Check those out, and plan accordingly. Flying into Jackson Hole can be very limited and expensive. We flew into Idaho and drove 2 hours (a beautiful drive) to stay in Jackson, which is only a few minutes from the race site. Arrive early on race day!

*Vacation Races holds raffles every 5-10 minutes before the start of the race. Prizes range from sponsor products to race entries. Participate in the club hikes and/or the trifecta.

DIFFICULTY
3
PRODUCTION
5
SCENERY
5
SWAG
5

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Full disclosure: I served as an ambassador for the Blue Ridge Marathon Series this year, which granted me free entry. That said, nothing about that influenced my thoughts on the … MORE

Full disclosure: I served as an ambassador for the Blue Ridge Marathon Series this year, which granted me free entry. That said, nothing about that influenced my thoughts on the event.

After an awesome trip to Roanoke for this race in 2018, Team workaddict(s) hit the mountains again. My full relay team from last year made the trip up from Florida again, and we brought 2 other relay teams and 3 half marathoners with us. Most of us arrived on Thursday and participated in the Friday morning shakeout run (a must if you’re in town!); the shakeout is a great way to explore the area a bit and meet other runners.

This race bills itself as America’s Toughest Road Marathon, and it’s not lying. The race starts in downtown Roanoke and starts climbing near the first mile marker. In all, there is a total elevation change of 7,400+ feet over the full marathon course.

Organizers provide transportation for relay members 2-4, via school buses, to their exchange zones (and from in the case of the 2nd runner). You just have to make it to the bus by certain times. If you miss the bus, your team is disqualified. It’s very well done and makes far more sense as you experience it than it does in reading it, though the directions are very clear.

As with most events, the air is electric. The surroundings are amazing, particularly coming back down Mill Mountain and looking over the city (the champagne — Moo-mosas — didn’t hurt).

All in all, the race is as brutal as advertised — in the best ways (all elevation gain/loss that you know going in) — beautiful, and so much fun. I’m looking forward to making another trip to #RunBlueRidge sometime, whether in the relay or one of the other distances.

If you’ve never participated in the event before, take the time to drive along the course and take in the beauty (and some of the climbs) without the race day blinders. Really, even if you have participated before, I think it’s worth another look. Participate in the shakeout run if you can. Between that run and the expo, you’ll meet all sorts of other runners. Above all else, have fun.

DIFFICULTY
5
PRODUCTION
5
SCENERY
5
SWAG
5

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The Gate River Run 15K is an outstanding event, drawing something like 20,000 people to Jacksonville, FL for 9.3 miles of awesome -- whether you're running for a championship or … MORE

The Gate River Run 15K is an outstanding event, drawing something like 20,000 people to Jacksonville, FL for 9.3 miles of awesome — whether you’re running for a championship or a party.

“A championship?” you might ask.

Indeed. The Gate River Run has been the USATF’s 15K national championship and is a great opportunity to share a race course with elite runners. That being said, most of us are here for the party.

The race starts and ends around the football stadium, home of the Jacksonville Jaguars. There are two big climbs in the races — the Main Street Bridge (2nd mile) and the Hart Bridge (the Green Monster; 8th mile); otherwise, the course is mostly tame and beautiful, making its way through several neighborhoods.

Speaking of those neighborhoods, the people of Jacksonville really come out along the course. There’s an electricity in the air on race day, and folks are out offering high fives, fist bumps, drinks, doughnuts, and snacks. Add in bands and djs along the course, and it really is a big party. There’s another one waiting for runners at the finish; after collecting the finisher’s medal and water, runners can enjoy beer, chocolate milk, and more.

Whatever you’re looking for, add the Gate River Run 15K to your racing calendar.

* Yes, it’s March, and it might be cool getting over to the starting corrals (where there are lots of portable toilets), but odds are good that Jacksonville Sun will turn up the heat. Some parts of the course provide some shade, and residents may turn on sprinklers if it’s really hot. However, be prepared for heat and sun.

* All runners receive a finisher’s medal (and a pint glass at the expo). The top 10% of men and women earn hats.

DIFFICULTY
3
PRODUCTION
5
SCENERY
4
SWAG
5

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I have to start by saying there aren't enough stars for me here. 5/5 is great, but I'd love to give it 7/5 or more. Whatever you've heard about Little … MORE

I have to start by saying there aren’t enough stars for me here. 5/5 is great, but I’d love to give it 7/5 or more.

Whatever you’ve heard about Little Rock racing (particularly the marathon weekend), it’s probably true. And it’s awesome.

Yes, the weekend races have a different theme each year (this year was space — A Race Odyssey). Yes, the marathon medal is massive (and the 2019 edition glows in the dark). But that’s only the surface. The city really shows out for the whole weekend — even in a mixed bag of conditions.

This was my first time running races on back-to-back days (Little Rock Challenge). I ran the 10K on Saturday and the marathon on Sunday. The races shared start/finish lines behind the host hotel/expo. Sundays races stayed together for the first 11+ miles and came back together briefly before the marathoners headed to the big climbs. The marathon route goes past Little Rock Central High School, which is a powerful part of the course and U.S. history.

A weather system moved through late Saturday and into race morning, bringing big changes from the overcast 45+ degree Saturday weather. At the race start, it was 38 degrees, with a real feel of 30. Forecasted rain, which had seemed to come early to miss the 8 a.m. start, began to fall as the runners took off. By the time I reached the first mile marker on the Broadway Bridge, the precipitation was ice. The rain and ice came and went through the first 5 miles or so, and there was a little bit of snow falling as I reached the half/full split…but the weather was still okay otherwise.

More remarkably, the city still came out to celebrate. I had read reviews here and watched a few elsewhere and was blown away by the community involvement on race day. And I confess, I spent a good portion of Saturday night hoping the weather would cooperate — more so that I could experience that race energy than for anything else. But even with the cold, and the rain, ice, and snow (from time to time), Little Rock showed up. I can’t think of very many areas where we runners were alone for long — the biggest stretch either in descent around mile 17 or on the out-and-back portion around miles 20 and 21 (though the Mello Velo group and the guitar guy shredding along the paved trail were awesome!).

There were plenty of water stops and portable bathrooms along the course, and the community was strong in that support as well. People served up grilled pineapple, tater tots, and brownies (maybe more) along the course, as well as a handful of alternate hydration stops featuring beer, mimosas, and more.

After finishing the race, runners were moved inside to collect medals, pasta, beer, chocolate milk, etc. and to reconnect with friends, loved ones, or other runners. Massages were also available, as they had been throughout the expo/race weekend.

Unfortunately, I cannot speak to the parking situation; I flew into town on Friday and stayed at the host hotel, so I didn’t have to worry about that. From the race information, it seemed to be okay, but I can’t say for certain. Same with transportation.

I try to have fun in most everything I do, and I went into this race weekend really looking to enjoy the experience rather than race the clock or some other pressure. Little Rock absolutely did not disappoint. From the party along the course and the atmosphere all weekend to the folks dressed up as aliens (and other costumes), Little Rock knows how to do it.

Enjoy the ride! This race is a lot of fun. There are challenging stretches, notably from about 14-17 or so, but it’s worth the work.

DIFFICULTY
3
PRODUCTION
5
SCENERY
4
SWAG
5

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Whatever you've heard about Little Rock racing (particularly the marathon weekend), it's probably true. And it's awesome. Yes, the weekend races have a different theme each year (this year was … MORE

Whatever you’ve heard about Little Rock racing (particularly the marathon weekend), it’s probably true. And it’s awesome.

Yes, the weekend races have a different theme each year (this year was space — A Race Odyssey). Yes, the marathon medal is massive. But that’s only the surface. The city really shows out for the whole weekend.

This was my first time running races on back-to-back days (Little Rock Challenge). I ran the 10K on Saturday and the marathon on Sunday. The 5K/10K started behind the host hotel/expo and made its way through town. There was a water stop at about 1.5, and there was also a local brewery handing out their own hydration. Party on, Little Rock!

The 5K and 10K split not far after that water stop, and we continued on our tour in the 10K. The races came back together before the end, and the final stretch was pumping with folks cheering and music thumping.

After finishing the race, runners were moved inside to collect medals and snacks, etc. It was there that I found a runner dressed as David Bowie and snapped a photo. There was a lady dressed as a spaceship with an alien, and others dressed as aliens. In all, most people seemed to be in it for the fun.

Unfortunately, I cannot speak to the parking situation; I flew into town on Friday and stayed at the host hotel, so I didn’t have to worry about that. From the race information, it seemed to be okay, but I can’t say for certain. Same with transportation.

All in all, a great experience. Go be a part of it.

Have fun. I probably don’t have to say that, but still. More seriously, the 10K has some bite to it, particularly in the 3rd and 4th miles with a couple of long climbs.

DIFFICULTY
2
PRODUCTION
5
SCENERY
3
SWAG
5

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I have participated in this event in one form or another for 5 years. It was my first half (2014) and my first full (2015). Through that time, the race … MORE

I have participated in this event in one form or another for 5 years. It was my first half (2014) and my first full (2015). Through that time, the race has gone through several changes — from starting/finishing at Florida State University to running a hilly route with a painted finish line to this year’s course, which started downtown and ended near FSU, rolling through various parts of the city along the way.

I ran the half marathon this year and found the new course to be a great way to experience the city, even as a resident. Runners passed Lake Ella in the early morning, rolled along through Cascades Park and Myers Park – across the pedestrian bridge and along FAMU Way, which is where the half and full marathons split. While marathon runners continued along the St. Marks Trail, the half marathon participants continued on to FSU’s campus and the new finish area in College Town.

Aid stations were placed about every 2 miles and stocked with fluids and Honey Stinger gels, all of which helped runners make it to the finish line. In addition to portable toilets at aid stations, the route ran through a couple of parks, which also had real restrooms.

Runners were announced by timers as we approached the finish and cheered in by spectators in College Town. At the finish, there was water, Gatorade, bagels, and fruit. In previous years, there had also been pizza or some other food and beer, but that was not the case this year. Food and beverages were available at the restaurants near the finish, but that’s not helpful if you don’t run with money.

This year, organizers arranged for Meb Keflezighi to come run the half marathon, as well as participate in a community shakeout run & expo time on Saturday and visits to local schools on Friday. That was a very cool experience.

All in all, it was a great day. There were shuttles taking runners from the finish area to the start and/or host hotel from 6 a.m. to 1 p.m., which made it easier to get from one place to the other.

** While I did not experience this myself, I have heard from runners who were at the back of the pack who were instructed onto the sidewalks less than 2 miles into the race and had no help crossing busy streets at a couple of points (within the first 4-ish miles).

* Ease into the first 7 miles or so, which is where the hills are. Roll the flatter back half.

DIFFICULTY
2
PRODUCTION
4
SCENERY
3
SWAG
4

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In the recent past, the Tallahassee Ultra Distance Classic has offered a 50-miler and a 50K (jokingly called the fun run). This year, directors added a marathon to cover the … MORE

In the recent past, the Tallahassee Ultra Distance Classic has offered a 50-miler and a 50K (jokingly called the fun run). This year, directors added a marathon to cover the fun and expand the options. I ran the 50K.

This was my second attempt at the distance, having ran this race in 2015 more or less on a whim. I thought of taking it on last year after my marathon, but it didn’t work out. I got to thinking about it again this year, and I took the bait.

The races run a series of loops in and around Edward Ball Wakulla Springs State Park. All races started at 7 a.m.; the 50K and marathon started together while the 50-miler started at a different location within the park. From there, 50-milers ran 8 loops, 50K runners ran 5, and marathon runners ran a loop in the park and then 4 regular course loops along park roads and a neighboring road. I’m sure that reads in a complicated fashion, but organizers and volunteers made sure everything went off smoothly.

Along the course, there were two aid stations — one with food and drinks and the other with water — with volunteers to record bib numbers and make sure everyone finished the appropriate number of loops. There was also a big aid station at the start/finish that had a variety of food and drinks. Both food stations had candies, chips, potatoes, soda, water, sports drink, and more.

As I’ve said in an earlier review, loop races get to me sometimes. One thing I like about this course is that you’re never really alone to let those doubts or concerns creep in. The way the 10K loop works is this: go out of the park to the left and out the road about 2.7 miles, where you turn around and go back a bit north of the park to turn around and reenter the park to complete the loop. As such, you’re always running with someone or meeting someone — and everyone (runners, volunteers, etc.) was incredibly encouraging.

After the race, I made my way to my car to change shoes and then to the cold water of Wakulla Springs to soak my feet and legs a bit. Then, I enjoyed some rices and beans near the start/finish area (this is also where the bathrooms were located — not relevant to this context but an important detail nonetheless.

The directors are stepping down after this race, so it will be interesting to see what happens to the race going forward. Still, if you’re looking to push yourself either to the marathon distance, a little bit beyond it, or all the way to 50 miles, this well-supported, relatively flat race is a great place to do it.

Bonus fun fact: The “Creature from the Black Lagoon” (and sequels) were filmed in part at Wakulla Springs.

* There is a 10-hour cutoff for all races. That probably applies the most to the 50-miler.

* After the race, take the time to enjoy the cold water in the springs. It’s a great relief after beating up your legs and feet.

DIFFICULTY
3
PRODUCTION
5
SCENERY
4
SWAG
5

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Oh my... So many things. For starters, this race was chosen by my fitness group -- #workaddict(s) -- to be our fall marathon. Fourteen of us (plus some family) traveled … MORE

Oh my… So many things. For starters, this race was chosen by my fitness group — #workaddict(s) — to be our fall marathon. Fourteen of us (plus some family) traveled from Florida to Chattanooga for the event. Eleven marathoners (3 rookies), a half marathoner, and a half marathon relay team later, we collected our rhino bling (and water bottle and finisher towel).

This was my fifth marathon, and I was excited at the prospect when it was chosen. Leading up to race day, I talked with several runners who had participated in previous years and encountered course issues (the half was short; the full was long). Those discussions made me a little leery, but the race more than made up for it and measured correctly this year.

The race starts near the blue rhino in Coolidge Park and hits the first bridge within the first mile. After a quick turn through downtown, we ran along the river walk (Tennessee River) and then back onto city streets before hitting the highway for bridge #2. We returned to the river walk (and spent a large portion of the race there overall). The course wound along the river, crossing several times, including over the Chickamauga Dam and the spectacular Walnut Street Bridge (pedestrian bridge) to the finish — back by the rhino. All told, the full marathon ran over 8 bridges, though there were several areas that I probably would’ve defined as a bridge that didn’t seem to be… Maybe that’s just me and the people I was near during the race.

Other than most people we talked with in town apparently not knowing there was a race going on soon, it was what you expect in a small race. Low-key expo, new friendly faces, plenty of space to run in on race day. Crowd support was lacking in places, though on par with smaller races. Crowds typically gathered around aid stations, though many were on the pedestrian bridge and by the start/finish.

Post-race goodies included the usual suspects, plus there was a pasta meal…though I did not partake. Apparently, there have been waffles in previous years.

Everything considered, this was a great race with lovely scenery. Chattanooga is a lovely city that welcomed me and my group and allowed us to explore one step at a time, both during the race and throughout the weekend. The downtown area is very walkable, which is good because you have to pay to park almost everywhere (most of the parking around the start/finish was VIP). Still, it was a great weekend and a great experience.

* Make yourself visible for the shuttle bus. We missed the first shuttle at our hotel because we were all huddled in the lobby from the cold/wind. The bus then took off early when no one was outside. Thankfully, there was another, which we didn’t let get away.

DIFFICULTY
4
PRODUCTION
4
SCENERY
4
SWAG
5

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Full disclosure up front: I won a relay entry into the Blue Ridge Marathon from RunChat on Twitter. That said, nothing about that influenced my thoughts on the event, other … MORE

Full disclosure up front: I won a relay entry into the Blue Ridge Marathon from RunChat on Twitter. That said, nothing about that influenced my thoughts on the event, other than making it more realistic to actually go. — Also, I marked parking “not sure” because we walked from our hotel to the start. I’m sure it was fine; everything else was tremendous.

As I said above, I participated on a team in the Blue Ridge Marathon relay. Team workaddict(s) made the trek from Florida for some mountain work. This race bills itself as America’s Toughest Road Marathon, and it’s not lying. Though I only ran the first leg (which is actually split into two runs), my teammates and I drove the parts of the course that we could (some is on a road you can’t access and/or on a paved greenway) and compared notes after the race.

Organizers provide transportation for relay members 2-4, via school buses, to their exchange zones (and from in the case of the 2nd runner). You just have to make it to the bus by certain times. If you miss the bus, your team is disqualified.

As with most events, the air is electric. The surroundings are amazing, particularly coming back down Mill Mountain and looking over the city (the champagne didn’t hurt). We met our fourth leg just above the finish chute and ran in together to close it down. After celebrating, we went back to the top of the chute and made a cheer tunnel for other runners.

All in all, the race is as brutal as advertised — in the best ways (all elevation gain/loss that you know going in) — beautiful, and so much fun. We were already talking about making a return trip sometime before we made it back to our hotel room.

If you’ve never participated in the event before, take the time to drive along the course and take in the beauty (and some of the climbs) without the race day blinders. Really, even if you have, I think it’s worth another look. Participate in the shakeout run if you can. Between that run and the expo, you’ll meet all sorts of other runners. By taking in those experiences, my team had several people (runners and not) cheering for us along the race course — sort of by name (cheers of “Hey, Tallahassee!” and “Do work!”)

DIFFICULTY
5
PRODUCTION
5
SCENERY
5
SWAG
5

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